Dental Implant London
The best Implant Surgery

Maxillary atrophy alternative bone grafts

“This revolutionary surgical technique is our answer to rehabilitating all bone types, whether with or without bone. The Galileus Cerclage Sinus® stands alone in its efficacy, rendering all other techniques unnecessary. With unparalleled benefits in stability, chewing function, and impeccable aesthetics, this technique offers atrophic patients far superior solutions and smiles compared to those who opt for procedures like all on 4 or all on 6.

The difference is staggering.”

 

“All the clinical cases presented here involve patients with severe atrophy of the upper jaw, with no posterior bone present. These patients, who come from various other clinics and dental practices with different diagnoses, would have been recommended various treatments such as autologous bone grafts, extensive maxillary sinus augmentations, or quad zygomatic implantology. However, had they undergone these techniques, they would not have experienced the remarkable benefits achieved through the Galileus Cerclage Sinus® surgical technique.

With our technique, these patients now enjoy a fully restored dental arch, with both front and back teeth allowing for proper chewing function, including all the molars. They benefit from improved masticatory function, unparalleled occlusion, a seamless transition between teeth without the need for false gums, and a natural-looking bridge comprising 14 zirconium ceramic teeth.

It’s noteworthy that atrophic patients treated at our center achieve superior clinical outcomes in terms of support, chewing, function, and aesthetics compared to those with adequate bone. Seeing and comparing the results is truly believing. The reason behind this stark contrast is simple: patients with sufficient bone would typically undergo techniques like all on 4 or all on 6, which do not provide all the posterior molars necessary for proper chewing.

Conversely, patients lacking posterior maxillary bone who undergo our Galileus Cerclage Sinus® technique obtain all the necessary posterior molar teeth, ensuring complete chewing function. It’s a paradox of sorts that nowadays, individuals might actually hope to lack posterior bone in the upper jaw to regain all their teeth, including the posterior molars, through our innovative technique. These patient testimonials urge reflection on the efficacy and benefits of our approach.”

Just this one technique, Galileus Cerclage Sinus®, is enough to avoid all the others.

Just this one technique, Galileus Cerclage Sinus®, is enough to avoid all the others.

Just this one technique, Galileus Cerclage Sinus®, is enough to avoid all the others.

Just this one technique, Galileus Cerclage Sinus®, is enough to avoid all the others.

Just this one technique, Galileus Cerclage Sinus®, is enough to avoid all the others.

Just this one technique, Galileus Cerclage Sinus®, is enough to avoid all the others.

Autologous bone graft surgeryGalileus Cerclage Sinus®:
Boneless dental solutions with Galileus Cerclage Sinus® surgical technique 4
Sinus Lift Implantology surgical technique large maxillary sinus liftsGalileus Cerclage Sinus®:
Galileus Cerclage Sinus® - Immediate loading implantology with little bone and no bone-Boneless dental solutions with Galileus Cerclage Sinus® surgical technique 4
Insertion of Pterygoid and Nasal Implants in Galileus Cerclage Sinus® (36)
All on 4 all on four implantology surgical techniqueGalileus Cerclage Sinus®:
All on 6 all on four implantology surgical techniqueGalileus Cerclage Sinus®:
Zigomatica quad all on four implantology surgical techniqueGalileus Cerclage Sinus®:

When a patient is diagnosed with the total absence of quality and quantity of alveolar bone in the upper jaw during a visit and wishes to regain bone through an autologous graft to allow the placement of dental implants, the treatment process may include the following steps:

1. Consultation and Evaluation: After the diagnosis of bone atrophy, the patient should consult with an oral surgeon or implantologist for a detailed assessment. During this visit, the professional will determine the clinical situation, discuss available options, and explain the recommended treatment plan.

2. Advanced Imaging: More advanced diagnostic images, such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), may be necessary to obtain a detailed view of the bone anatomy and plan the surgery precisely.

3. Choice of Donor Area: In the case of an autologous graft, the surgeon and the patient will need to discuss and decide on the donor area, usually taken from regions such as the iliac crest of the hip or the jaw. This decision will take into account the amount of bone needed and the patient’s preferences.

4. Surgical Planning: Based on the analysis and imaging results, the surgeon will plan the surgery, determining the bone harvesting technique, its shape and dimensions, as well as the position of the dental implants.

5. Surgical Procedure: During the surgery, the surgeon will harvest the bone from the donor area and place it in the atrophic area of the upper jaw. Subsequently, they will insert dental implants in the planned positions.

6. Healing Period: The patient must diligently follow postoperative instructions to promote proper healing. The healing period may vary, but it is essential to allow the new bone to integrate with the existing bone.

7. Prosthetic Fixation: After complete healing, the installation of a fixed dental prosthesis supported by the implants will proceed. This phase will be managed by the prosthodontist or prosthetic dentist.

It is important to note that each case is unique, and the treatment plan may vary based on the specific needs and conditions of the patient. Close collaboration with the medical team and a comprehensive understanding of the treatment path are crucial to ensuring the success of restoring functional chewing.

1. Consultation and Evaluation:

In the case of choosing autologous bone graft during the consultation and evaluation, the patient and the oral surgeon or implantologist will collaborate to establish a personalized treatment plan. Here are specific aspects that might be addressed during this phase:

  • Discussion of Options: The patient will receive detailed information about available options for autologous bone grafting. This may include choosing the source of bone harvesting, such as the iliac crest of the hip or the jaw, and possible harvesting techniques.
  • Exploration of the Donor Area: If autologous grafting is chosen, the surgeon will carefully explore the planned donor area to ensure its suitability for harvesting and that it can provide the necessary amount of bone for reconstruction in the atrophic area of the upper jaw.
  • Imaging Examinations: Advanced imaging exams, such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), will be conducted to obtain a detailed view of the quantity and quality of bone in both involved areas (donor and recipient).
  • Health Assessment: The patient’s overall health will be evaluated to ensure suitability for surgery and the subsequent healing phase.
  • Detailed Surgical Planning: The surgeon will plan the surgery in detail, establishing the precise location of the graft, fixation techniques, and the insertion of dental implants if applicable.
  • Discussion of Risks and Benefits: The surgeon will discuss with the patient the risks and benefits of autologous bone grafting, including details about the healing period, success rates, and any postoperative risks.
  • Planning the Healing Period: The approximate duration of the healing period necessary before proceeding with the next phase of treatment will be discussed.

Accurate consultation and evaluation are crucial to determining the feasibility and success of autologous bone grafting. Open communication between the patient and the medical team is essential to ensure a comprehensive understanding of the process and address any questions or concerns the patient may have.

2. Advanced Imaging:

During the “Advanced Imaging” phase in the context of an autologous bone graft procedure for the reconstruction of the atrophic upper jaw, advanced imaging exams are employed to obtain a detailed view of the involved bone anatomy. These exams provide crucial information for accurate surgical planning. Below are descriptions of some commonly used advanced imaging exams:

  • Computed Tomography (CT): CT is a three-dimensional imaging tool that provides precise details about bone structure, including density and morphology. This type of imaging is particularly useful for evaluating the amount of available bone, identifying surrounding anatomical structures, and accurately planning the position and dimensions of the graft.
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): MRI offers a detailed view of the surrounding soft tissues and can be useful for assessing the overall health of tissues, including muscles and blood vessels. Although less commonly used than CT for bone evaluation, MRI can provide additional information about the anatomical and physiological context.
  • Cone Beam CT Scan (CBCT): The CBCT scan is specifically designed for dental and maxillofacial imaging. It provides high-resolution three-dimensional images of bone structures, enabling detailed planning for surgical procedures, including bone grafts.
  • Bone Scintigraphy: This exam can be used to assess the vitality and metabolic activity of the bone. If necessary, it can help identify any bone health issues that might influence the decision to use autologous grafts.

The use of such advanced exams allows the surgeon to clearly visualize the quantity, quality, and structure of the bone in the involved areas. This detailed information is essential for precise surgical planning, ensuring the success of the graft and any related procedures, such as dental implant placement.

3. Choice of Donor Area:

In the “Choice of Donor Area” phase of autologous grafting for the reconstruction of the upper jaw, crucial decisions are made regarding the source of bone harvesting. Here are key points that may be considered during this phase:

  • Assessment of Donor Area Suitability: The surgeon must carefully assess the planned donor area, which could be the iliac crest of the hip, the jaw, or other specific areas. This assessment considers the amount of bone needed for reconstruction and whether the donor area can provide a sufficient quantity of good-quality bone.
  • Patient Preferences: Patient preferences play a significant role in choosing the donor area. Some patients may feel more comfortable with one harvesting source over another. The surgeon should openly discuss with the patient and take their preferences into account.
  • Surgical Needs and Graft Design: The choice of the donor area influences the surgical technique and graft design. For example, bone harvested from the iliac crest may require different processing compared to that taken from the jaw.
  • Amount of Bone Required: The amount of bone needed for upper jaw reconstruction will influence the decision on the donor area. In some cases, it may be necessary to harvest bone from more than one area.
  • Donor Area Healing Time: The healing time of the donor area is an important factor to consider. For instance, the recovery time after harvesting from the iliac crest might be different than harvesting from the jaw.
  • Minimization of Postoperative Discomfort: The surgeon will aim to minimize postoperative discomfort in the donor area. This could influence the choice of the area, taking into account the speed of healing and pain reduction.

The choice of the donor area is a critical step in the autologous bone grafting process and requires a careful assessment of patient needs, surgical options, and practical considerations related to the area itself. Collaboration between the patient and the surgeon is essential for making informed and personalized decisions.

4. Surgical Planning:

In the “Surgical Planning” phase for an autologous bone graft in the context of reconstructing the atrophic upper jaw, the surgeon develops a detailed plan that will guide the entire procedure. Here are some aspects that might be included in surgical planning:

  • Precise Placement of the Graft: The surgeon will determine the precise position where the autologous bone graft will be inserted into the atrophic area of the upper jaw. This decision takes into account the amount of bone needed and the design of the reconstruction.
  • Size and Shape of the Graft: Based on information obtained from advanced imaging exams, the surgeon will plan the size and shape of the graft. This may include shaping the harvested bone to ensure precise anatomical matching.
  • Fixation Techniques: The plan must define graft fixation techniques to ensure stability during the healing period. This could involve the use of screws, plates, or other fixation devices.
  • Design of Dental Implant Placement (If Applicable): If the ultimate goal includes dental implant placement, the surgeon will plan the position and angulation of dental implants in the newly inserted bone. This must be done to ensure adequate support for the fixed dental prosthesis.
  • Aesthetic and Functional Considerations: Planning must also consider aesthetic and functional aspects, such as the shape of the jaw, tooth positioning, and how the reconstruction will impact the final appearance and function.
  • Reduction of Surgical Trauma: The plan should seek to minimize surgical trauma, considering bone harvesting techniques that ensure quicker healing and less morbidity for the patient.
  • Postoperative Pain Management: A strategy for postoperative pain management will be anticipated, including analgesic medications and other measures to ensure patient comfort during the healing period.

Surgical planning is an essential step for the success of the procedure, ensuring that every detail is carefully considered before the actual operation. This process allows the surgeon to address the specific challenges of the case and customize the intervention based on the patient’s needs and preferences.

5. Surgical Procedure:

The “Surgical Procedure” phase is the moment when the previously devised plan is put into action to perform the autologous bone graft for the reconstruction of the atrophic upper jaw. The following steps could be included during the surgical procedure:

  • Anesthesia: The patient undergoes general or local anesthesia, depending on the needs and preferences of the patient and surgeon. Anesthesia ensures that the patient does not experience pain during the procedure.
  • Surgical Access: The surgeon makes a surgical incision in the donor area, which may be the iliac crest of the hip, the jaw, or another area previously identified during the planning phase.
  • Autologous Bone Harvesting: Bone is harvested from the donor area according to the techniques planned during the choice of donor area phase. This may involve cutting, shaping, or other procedures specific to the harvesting source.
  • Preparation of the Recipient Area: The atrophic area of the upper jaw is prepared to receive the graft. This may include the removal of soft tissues, preparation of the graft site, and creation of adequate spaces for the insertion of the autologous bone.
  • Placement of the Graft: The autologous bone graft is positioned and secured in the planned position. Fixation techniques may include the use of screws, plates, or other surgical devices.
  • Insertion of Dental Implants (If Applicable): If the treatment plan also includes the insertion of dental implants, this step is performed in this phase. Implants are precisely placed in the newly grafted bone.
  • Bleeding Control: Throughout the procedure, bleeding control is a priority. The surgeon takes measures to maintain a clean surgical environment and ensure optimal healing.
  • Wound Closure: Once all necessary interventions are completed, the surgeon carefully closes the surgical wound with stitches or other closure materials.
  • Postoperative Monitoring: After the procedure, the patient is closely monitored in the postoperative ward to ensure a safe recovery from anesthesia and to prevent immediate complications.

The surgical procedure is a critical phase of the process, and the surgeon’s expertise is crucial for the success of the autologous bone graft. Collaboration between the patient and the medical team continues during the postoperative period to ensure optimal healing.

6. Healing Period:

The “Healing Period” is a crucial phase in the autologous bone graft process for the reconstruction of the atrophic upper jaw. During this period, the patient follows the medical team’s instructions to allow proper integration of the harvested bone and promote healing of the surgical area. Here are key aspects of this phase:

  • Postoperative Monitoring: After the surgery, the patient will undergo regular check-ups to assess healing progress and address any early complications. These appointments allow the surgeon to closely monitor progress and make any necessary adjustments to the treatment plan.
  • Pain Management: The patient may experience pain and swelling in the donor and recipient areas. The medical team will provide guidance on managing pain, including the use of prescribed pain relievers and other comfort measures.
  • Careful Oral Hygiene: Oral hygiene is crucial during the healing period. The patient must follow the dentist’s or surgeon’s instructions regarding cleaning the treated area to avoid infections and promote optimal healing.
  • Proper Diet: A proper diet is important to support healing. The patient may receive instructions on the consistency of foods and the need to avoid hard or irritating foods for a certain period.
  • Avoiding Intense Physical Activities: During the healing period, the patient should limit intense physical activity to avoid excessive stress on the surgical area. Rest and avoiding situations that could compromise healing are crucial.
  • Follow-up Examinations: Regular follow-up exams will be scheduled to assess the integration of the harvested bone, the placement of dental implants (if inserted), and overall healing. These check-ups allow the medical team to make any necessary adjustments to the treatment plan based on the patient’s individual response.
  • Control X-rays: Control X-rays may be taken to assess the stability of dental implants and bone integration over time.

The healing period can vary from person to person and depends on the complexity of the surgical procedure and the individual patient’s response. Ongoing collaboration between the patient and the medical team is essential to ensure complete healing and long-term treatment success.

6. Healing Period:

The “Healing Period” is a crucial phase in the autologous bone graft process for the reconstruction of the atrophic upper jaw. During this period, the patient follows the medical team’s instructions to allow proper integration of the harvested bone and promote healing of the surgical area. Here are key aspects of this phase:

  • Postoperative Monitoring: After the surgery, the patient will undergo regular check-ups to assess healing progress and address any early complications. These appointments allow the surgeon to closely monitor progress and make any necessary adjustments to the treatment plan.
  • Pain Management: The patient may experience pain and swelling in the donor and recipient areas. The medical team will provide guidance on managing pain, including the use of prescribed pain relievers and other comfort measures.
  • Careful Oral Hygiene: Oral hygiene is crucial during the healing period. The patient must follow the dentist’s or surgeon’s instructions regarding cleaning the treated area to avoid infections and promote optimal healing.
  • Proper Diet: A proper diet is important to support healing. The patient may receive instructions on the consistency of foods and the need to avoid hard or irritating foods for a certain period.
  • Avoiding Intense Physical Activities: During the healing period, the patient should limit intense physical activity to avoid excessive stress on the surgical area. Rest and avoiding situations that could compromise healing are crucial.
  • Follow-up Examinations: Regular follow-up exams will be scheduled to assess the integration of the harvested bone, the placement of dental implants (if inserted), and overall healing. These check-ups allow the medical team to make any necessary adjustments to the treatment plan based on the patient’s individual response.
  • Control X-rays: Control X-rays may be taken to assess the stability of dental implants and bone integration over time.

The healing period can vary from person to person and depends on the complexity of the surgical procedure and the individual patient’s response. Ongoing collaboration between the patient and the medical team is essential to ensure complete healing and long-term treatment success.

8. Surgical Timelines:

The surgical timelines related to the reconstruction of the atrophic upper jaw through an autologous bone graft and the placement of dental implants can vary based on several factors, including the complexity of the case, the patient’s health, and the specific treatment plan. Here is a general estimate of the surgical timelines associated with this type of procedure:

  • Donor Area Preparation:
    • Surgical Time: Approximately 1-2 hours, depending on the chosen donor area (iliac crest, jaw, etc.).
  • Healing Times After Donor Area Preparation:
    • Initial Healing: 2-4 weeks for incision closure and initial recovery.
    • Complete Healing: Complete healing of the donor area may take several weeks or months, depending on the patient.
  • Upper Jaw Reconstruction Surgery Times:
    • Surgical Time: 2-4 hours, depending on the case’s complexity and the need to insert implants simultaneously.
  • Healing Times After Reconstruction Surgery:
    • Initial Healing Phase: 2-4 weeks for incision healing and initial stability of the graft.
  • Dental Implant Placement Times:
    • Surgical Time: 1-2 hours, depending on the number of implants and their location.
  • Osteointegration Times:
    • Osteointegration Phase: 3-6 months, during which dental implants integrate with the surrounding bone.
  • Temporary Fixed Prosthesis Mounting Times:
    • Surgical Time: 1-2 hours, when it’s necessary to insert a temporary fixed prosthesis during the healing phase.
  • Adjustment and Replacement Times of Temporary Prosthesis with Definitive:
    • Adjustment and Monitoring: Vary but may require several visits over several weeks or months.
    • Replacement with Definitive Prosthesis: After the osteointegration phase, the temporary prosthesis can be replaced with a definitive prosthesis, which may require several visits for adaptation.

Exact times may vary based on the specific characteristics of the case and the individual patient’s response. It is important to emphasize that these are approximate times, and the treatment plan will be customized based on the specific needs of each patient.

8. Risks Associated with Autologous Bone Graft and Its Harvesting:

The process of autologous bone graft harvesting and grafting carries potential risks, and patients must be fully informed before undergoing such procedures. Here are some of the risks and complications associated with these procedures:

  • Infections:
    • Infections can occur in the donor or recipient area. The risk of infection is generally controlled through aseptic surgical practices and the administration of antibiotics.
  • Pain and Swelling:
    • Bone harvesting from the donor area and grafting can cause pain and swelling. Pain management is essential for patient comfort during the postoperative period.
  • Bleeding:
    • Bleeding is a common complication during surgery. The surgeon must take appropriate measures to control bleeding and ensure coagulation.
  • Allergic Reactions or Adverse Reactions to Graft Material:
    • In rare cases, patients may develop allergic reactions or adverse reactions to the material used for grafting. This is more common with synthetic materials.
  • Healing Problems:
    • Healing can be compromised by various factors, including vascularization issues, systemic patient diseases, or lack of adherence to postoperative instructions.
  • Graft Dissolution or Resorption:
    • In some cases, the harvested bone may resorb more than expected, affecting the success of the graft. This complication may require additional corrective interventions.
  • Failure of Dental Implant Osseointegration:
    • In cases where dental implant placement is also planned, failure of osseointegration may occur, leading to the loss of implant stability.
  • Sensorial Alterations:
    • Bone grafting can result in sensorial alterations in the donor area, such as the mandible, which may include numbness or altered sensations.
  • Anesthesia-Related Complications:
    • Anesthesia carries risks, although they are generally rare. These include allergic reactions, respiratory, or cardiovascular issues.
  • Aesthetic Issues:
    • Procedures can influence the aesthetics of the face and mouth, and in some cases, asymmetries or undesired changes may occur.

It is crucial for the patient to openly discuss with the surgeon all risks, complications, and expectations before undergoing the intervention. A complete understanding of these aspects will enable the patient to make informed decisions and actively collaborate with the medical team throughout the entire treatment process.

9. Failures and Risks:

Failures of autologous bone grafts can occur, although they are relatively rare events. When this happens, the patient may face various options and considerations. Here are some possible situations and how the failure of an autologous bone graft could be managed:

  • Evaluation of the Cause of Failure:
    • After a graft failure, it is essential to conduct a thorough evaluation to understand the underlying cause of the problem. Reasons may vary and include healing issues, infections, vascularization problems, or other complications.
  • Repeat Autologous Bone Graft:
    • In some cases, the surgeon might recommend repeating the autologous bone graft after identifying and resolving the cause of the failure. This could be an appropriate option if the patient still has enough available donor area, and the situation can be successfully addressed.
  • Use of Alternative Techniques:
    • Alternatively, alternative techniques for the reconstruction of the atrophic upper jaw could be considered. For example, using bone grafts from different sources, the use of biomaterials, or the approach with zygomatic implants could be options to evaluate.
  • Considerations for Implant Placement:
    • If the graft failure affects the placement of dental implants, alternative solutions may need to be explored to ensure implant stability. This could include the use of longer implants or other specialized techniques.
  • Removable Prosthetics or Prosthetic Adjustments:
    • In the meantime, it may be necessary to consider removable prosthetic options or temporary adjustments to ensure the patient’s adequate chewing function and satisfactory aesthetic appearance while planning the next steps.
  • Counseling and Decision-Making with the Patient:
    • Actively involving the patient in the decision-making process is essential. The surgeon and dental team must openly discuss the available options, risks, and benefits of each choice with the patient.

In any case, addressing a graft failure requires a thorough professional evaluation and the customization of the treatment plan based on the specific needs of the patient. Counseling and collaboration between the patient and the medical team are crucial to addressing the situation in an informed and effective manner.

10. Guarantees in Autologous Bone Grafting:

The issue of guarantees in autologous bone grafting cases is complex and can vary based on various factors, including clinic protocols, specific patient conditions, and the nature of the treatment. Here are some points to consider:

  • Results Not Guaranteed:
    • It is important to emphasize that, despite the surgeon’s skills and professional care, results of autologous bone grafts cannot be guaranteed 100%. Individual patient response and biological factors can influence the outcome of the procedure.
  • Follow Surgeon’s Instructions:
    • Patients must carefully follow postoperative instructions provided by the surgeon. These instructions include oral hygiene, postoperative diet, medication intake, and other critical aspects to promote optimal healing.
  • Risk Assessment:
    • Before the procedure, the surgeon should discuss potential risks and complications associated with autologous bone grafts with the patient. This risk assessment should be an integral part of the patient’s informed consent.
  • Warranties on Materials and Procedure:
    • Some clinics may offer limited warranties on the materials used and the procedure itself for a specified period. This varies from facility to facility and often pertains more to the quality of materials than a guarantee of long-term success.
  • Follow-up and Monitoring:
    • Quality clinics typically provide follow-up programs to monitor patients in the postoperative period. These check-ups allow the surgeon to assess healing, address any issues, and make necessary adjustments.
  • Open Communication with the Patient:
    • It is crucial for the clinic to maintain open and transparent communication with the patient. If problems or complications arise, the patient should feel comfortable communicating with the surgeon to resolve the situation.

Before undergoing any procedure, it is essential for the patient to have a detailed discussion with the surgeon or medical team regarding all aspects of the treatment, including risks and any guarantees offered. Informed consent, including detailed information about potential complications, is an essential part of this process.

“If you are an atrophic patient without posterior upper jaw bone, we want to inform you that there is no longer a need for invasive surgeries involving autologous bone grafts—lengthy, costly, painful, and invasive, with no guarantee of success. Instead, you can benefit from an alternative surgical option called Galileus Cerclage Sinus®, a lesser-known surgery precisely by those who need it the most.

Dear Patient,

We understand your desire to achieve a new fixed set of teeth and how important it is for you to reach this goal. We would like to discuss a natural surgical option that could be advantageous for your specific situation: Galileus Cerclage Sinus®.

Your current atrophic condition without posterior upper jaw alveolar bone may present challenges, but Galileus Cerclage Sinus® offers an innovative and effective solution to overcome these obstacles. This surgical technique aims to immediately address atrophy in the posterior maxillary sinuses, avoiding the need for autologous grafts or extensive sinus lifts.

Here are some reasons why you might consider Galileus Cerclage Sinus® as your preferred option:

Avoids Autologous Grafts and Extensive Lifts: Galileus Cerclage Sinus® allows you to overcome atrophy without resorting to autologous grafts, thus avoiding more invasive procedures and associated healing times.

Immediate Loading: With this technique, immediate loading on dental implants is possible, allowing you to enjoy the benefits of a new fixed set of teeth sooner.

Maintains Full Chewing Function: Galileus Cerclage Sinus® offers an ideal distribution of chewing forces, ensuring complete and comfortable function in your new set of teeth.

Stratospheric Aesthetics: The prosthesis created with this technique is custom-designed by an Italian master prosthetic craftsman, guaranteeing a stratospherically aesthetic and natural result.

Avoids False Gum: Unlike other options, Galileus Cerclage Sinus® does not require a large frontal false gum, contributing to a more aesthetically pleasing solution.

Improved Occlusion and Comfort: Thanks to the customization of the prosthesis and optimization of occlusion, you can enjoy optimal comfort and efficient chewing.

We would like to discuss this option in more detail and answer all your questions. Your satisfaction and well-being are our priorities, and we are here to support you at every stage of this journey.”

“Overcoming Maxillary Atrophy with Galileus Cerclage Sinus®: Fixed Teeth without Bone Grafts”

1. Cortical Basal Bones and Implant Anchors:

Cortical basal bones are regions of the maxillary bone characterized by significant density and strength, often classified as category D1 according to the Lekholm and Zarb bone classification, representing the highest level of density. These areas serve as robust support pillars within the human skull. In the surgical technique of Galileus Cerclage Sinus®, these cortical basal bones are utilized to anchor special dental implants, providing a solution without the need for bone grafts. The main categories of cortical basal bones include:

  1. Zygomatic Cortical Basal Bones:
    • Located in the zygomatic region of the skull, these bones are remarkably robust and provide solid anchorage for dental implants.
  2. Canines Cortical Basal Bones:
    • Situated in the canine region, near the canines teeth, these bones also exhibit high density, contributing to the stability of implants.
  3. Pterygoid Palatine Cortical Basal Bones:
    • Found in the pterygoid region of the palate, these areas offer a resilient bone substrate, used to anchor implants, ensuring a solid foundation in the posterior part of the maxilla.

The specific approach of the Galileus Cerclage Sinus® surgical technique enables overcoming the challenges of maxillary atrophy, transforming anatomically problematic areas into strategic points for effective chewing and long-term stability of fixed dental prostheses. The robustness and strength of cortical basal bones are crucial elements for the success of the procedure, providing patients with a quick and durable solution for their dental conditions.

Certainly, I’m here to explain in detail how the Galileus Cerclage Sinus® surgical technique can be the optimal solution for your current condition, characterized by the lack of posterior alveolar bone in the upper jaw.

  1. Utilization of the Pterygoid Bone: In the Galileus Cerclage Sinus® procedure, we utilize the pterygoid bone, an extremely hard and resistant portion, as an anchor for pterygoid implants. These implants, ranging from 19/21 mm in length, are inserted into the 18/28 zones of the jaw, effectively resolving atrophy in the most extreme and posterior areas.
  2. Insertion of Nasal Implants: To complete the resolution of atrophy, two implants called nasal implants (length 18/19 mm) are inserted transversely, ascending the jaw to point 15/25 in the opposite direction. These implants encircle the maxillary sinuses, safeguarding and protecting them.
  3. Posterior Pillars for Chewing Function: The insertion of these implants forms the four necessary posterior pillars to support a fixed dental prosthesis, ensuring efficient chewing function and long-term stability.
  4. Avoidance of Autologous Grafts and Large Lifts: The Galileus Cerclage Sinus® procedure eliminates the need for autologous grafts and large lifts, offering a quicker and less invasive solution.
  5. Insertion of Frontal Implants: In the frontal area (premaxilla), 2 to 4 regular dental implants are inserted, inclined or blade-shaped, depending on the conditions of the remaining bone. These implants complete the support structure for the fixed dental prosthesis.
  6. Improved Chewing Force Distribution: Thanks to the optimal distribution of chewing forces across the entire peripheral arch of the jaw, Galileus Cerclage Sinus® supports a fixed zirconia ceramic prosthesis, including all missing molars in both the frontal and posterior regions.
  7. Natural Aesthetics without Frontal Gum Prosthesis: The handcrafted and custom-made prosthesis not only provides complete and comfortable chewing but also achieves a stratospheric aesthetic result without the need for a large frontal gum prosthesis.
  8. Long-term Satisfaction: This procedure not only resolves severe atrophies of the upper jaw but also offers a lasting solution, allowing you to fully enjoy your smile for many years to come.

If you would like further details or have specific questions, I am here to address any inquiries you may have.

“Circular Zirconia Masterpiece: Galileus Cerclage Sinus® Revolutionizing Aesthetics and Functionality in Dental Prosthetics”

The circular zirconia ceramic dental prosthesis with 14 teeth, devoid of false gum, is the pinnacle of an innovative surgical process like Galileus Cerclage Sinus®, expertly transforming a problematic atrophic area into a strategic support hub through the articulate placement of dental implants. Crafted by the inspired work of the master craftsman Patrizio Marcato, an Italian dental prosthetist, this prosthesis is a genuine masterpiece that seamlessly blends functionality and aesthetics into a sublime union.

  1. Complete and Profound Chewing: With the skillful placement of dental implants and the circular structure of the prosthesis, not only complete but also profound chewing is realized. The previously critical area becomes a functional chewing perimeter that embraces the entire upper jaw arch.
  2. Rediscovered Functionality: Once a problematic zone, it reinvents itself as a strategic support region through the ingenious placement of dental implants, offering the patient a rediscovered chewing functionality and tangibly improving the quality of life.
  3. Correct Chewing and Good Digestion: The prosthesis facilitates correct chewing by wisely utilizing the area where maximum force is concentrated during the chewing process. This not only contributes to superior chewing but also promotes optimal and healthy digestion.
  4. Custom-Made Fixed Prosthesis: Crafted with artisanal mastery by Italian dental prosthetist Patrizio Marcato, every detail of the prosthesis is modeled with meticulous precision, following a rigorous protocol. Customization ensures a flawless adaptation to the patient’s physiognomy.
  5. Impeccable Functional Aesthetics: The aesthetics of the prosthesis are extraordinary, with the perfect combination of high-quality ceramics and zirconia. The functional aspect is equally impeccable, giving the smile a natural and harmonious appearance.
  6. Trial Process and Final Baking: The patient is involved in all stages, from the initial trial to the final baking. The master craftsman incorporates the patient’s indications and preferences, ensuring a tailor-made prosthesis. The final baking provides strength and durability to the prosthesis.
  7. Delivery Like a Jewel: The prosthesis is delivered in an exquisite black velvet box, sealing its status as a genuine jewel. This exclusive presentation reflects the uniqueness and value of the prosthesis, transforming it into a precious testimony of art and functionality.
  8. Promise of Eternal Youth: Beyond being an extraordinary dental creation, the prosthesis represents a promise of eternal youth. The timeless reflection in the mirror gives the patient an ageless instant, leaving an indelible impression on anyone who beholds it.

In conclusion, the circular zirconia ceramic dental prosthesis is an eloquent symbol of surgical excellence and craftsmanship, offering the patient not only a functional solution but an authentic and enduring masterpiece in aesthetics.

We now present a highly atrophic clinical case. The patient who came to our attention had a severe lack of bone in the posterior alveolar areas of the upper jaw. Panoramic X-rays clearly show the absence of alveolar bone in these areas, beneath the maxillary sinuses. Despite visits to various specialized centers, no doctor or facility seemed capable of addressing this significant atrophy.

In one clinic, the option of undergoing a quad zygomatic implant surgery was offered, involving the placement of 4 zygomatic implants ranging from 35 mm to 55 mm. These would extend from the cheekbone into the oral cavity in the frontal area known as the premaxilla, providing immediate loading with a dental prosthesis that included a large frontal false gum to cover the body and path of these large dental implants.

Given the patient’s young age and her preference for a more aesthetically and functionally pleasing option, the response received was that unfortunately, there were no concrete and guaranteed alternatives unless the patient opted for autologous bone grafting or large maxillary sinus lifts. However, these options involved aspects such as waiting times, pain, invasiveness, and a lack of guarantees.

Fortunately, the patient was not persuaded and continued to seek alternative solutions to autologous bone grafts and large maxillary sinus lifts. During this search, she discovered our Galileus Cerclage Sinus® technique, designed to immediately address posterior atrophies of the maxillary sinuses, bypassing both grafts and sinus lifts.

After viewing some of our Galileus Cerclage Sinus® surgery videos, showing the insertion of pterygoid and nasal implants in the posterior pterygoid basal bones, the patient was definitively convinced. This surgical solution not only offers resolution without invasive procedures but also provides a complete fixed prosthesis with all posterior molars, ensuring complete masticatory function, ideal force distribution, and optimal occlusion.

With custom crafting by an Italian master prosthetist, the aesthetic result is extraordinary, without the need for a false gum, appearing very natural and fully satisfying the patient. After understanding, learning, and delving into the treatment plan, the patient accepted the Galileus Cerclage Sinus® intervention. Now, we invite you to watch the surgery and judge the results for yourselves from all these perspectives.

Visits: 0

Call Now Button
× SOS